David's Blog

New Showreel and How You Hope a Job Interview Doesn’t End.

A few months back I wrote a blog about a failed job interview, as people seemed to like it here is another one. Above is a new After Effects Showreel I have created too, take a look if you have a minuet free.

I knew this interview wasn’t going to go well, firstly I was called Tom straight after I had introduced myself as David. Secondly he didn’t want to see my showreel and thirdly this gentlemen was bald. For those that do not know I am cursed with hair that looks like that of a poor-man’s Dennis the Menace. It is a hair that makes even barbers sigh on the occasional time I walk into their shop. In short it resembles a birds nest, without the utilitarian function. While no birds have nested in it (as far as I am aware), it is very possible for things to make a temporary home- spiders, bees, the odd ex-girlfriend who I assumed had run away who now spends her days eating the spiders and bees.

While I have no problem with baldies per say (Darwin, Bruce Willis and the most majestic of all creatures the naked mole rat), they have a problem with me- or more accurately my hair. This beautiful mop is an affront to their shiny lifestyle, an attack of their follicle-less head. I am a reminder of their youth (a misjudged reminder of course, put a oversized- fetus and a tiny bald person next to each other and you would never work out which one was which).

The interview went like this:

Bald Interviewer: So Tom

Me: David

Bald Interviewer: Your CV ends mid 2013.

Me: I have been doing a variety of jobs, some have been based in Portugal were I work as a photo manipulator, my online portfolio shows a range of new videos. This CV is personalized for this job and contains only the most relevant information.

Bald Interviewer: Yeh Whatever. Do you play Golf Tom?

Me: David.

Bald Interviewer: hmm?

Shit, this is an unrehearsed question! Code Red. Code Fucking Red. Think fast. Do crazy Golf and Wii Sports count?!

Me: Poorly, but from the companies website I see you do. I do however play tennis.

Nailed it.

Bald Interviewer:  Tennis is a women’s sport. Everyone plays Golf at my company Tom.

My company?! Does this idiot own the business?

Me: I’m a fast learner sir.

Smooth.  

And so the interview went on rather well and then came the closing lines:

Bald Interviewer: Your a likable guy Tom*

Me: David

Bald Interviewer: But I don’t like you

Me: …So…how long until I find out I am successful?

Damn you hair!

*The general consensus is that this is incorrect. I am in fact a grumpy bastard. 

 

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Photo Stitching

My girlfriend has taken up stitching with her (great) Grandmother’s old sewing machine. I have been doing some stitching myself, but not with needles and thread but photographs and an editing software.

Friends who do not own DSLRs and Photoshop moan to me that they have not been able to do any of my blogs so far, so this is a simple technique that can be done with ANY type of camera (or camera app) and any type of photo editing software (for a free alternative to photoshop look at Gimp, if you have a mac Pixelmator is well worth it’s £10).

Panorama’s are all in at the moment thanks to some brilliant apps on smart phones but I have a few problems:

248563_10152123703730206_247809526_n

1. the image quality is not great

2. the image is too trimmed (which means you are stuck doing landscape shots)

3. They never look as good as you hope

By digitally stitching together pictures you can have full control over the image. When taking pictures there are several things to remember:

1. make sure your images can be overlapped, it is useless if there is a gap.

2. make sure there is a ‘point’ to an image being so large, if you want to show say a ladybird on a leaf, is stitching loads of images around the lady bird going to make the eyes focus on that little red and black specimen?

3. Have you got everything you need? Remember the image will have to be cropped, so shoot a bit of sky or ground if you need

4. Make sure you take the pics pretty darn quick so the image looks like it was all in one shot and make sure the camera exposure is consistent.

5. Have fun 🙂

Now when you put the photographs side by side in your application they’re going to look like what they are, a jumble of shots side by side. So now you have to take those pictures and overlap them where they correspond and start rubbing out the edges and duplicates. This is the most time consuming part, the heading photo was quick as it was five different tripod shots (18mm lens, 600d) while the shot at the end of this post took a little longer as I needed to crop, resize and duplicate some of the images to get all the tree trunk and surrounding canopy (that shot was taken a Nikon D300 with 17-200mm lens.) But why be so linear? Big spaces are what the panoramic image was made for but with stitching you can go in any direction. This bug below was first shown on my Lens Duplication Reversion Blog but as as equally at home here. Why? Because it is actually many many many images all crammed into one, as the image next to it shows:

bug and shots

Also why do you even have to hide it’s a collection? Why not show it for what it is? A higgledy piggledy messy collage? Isn’t that right Jellings? (that’s James Jellings on the top right…he’s a friend from the uni days). I am going to do more posts on this soon as I think there’s a lot more to say on the subject but for now comment with anything you have to say and flick through my flickr set.

garlic forest